Aslı Çavuşoğlu: The Stones Talk
Aslı Çavuşoğlu
The Stones Talk

Curator: Özge Ersoy

15 November 2013-12 January 2014
Aslı Çavuşoğlu, "The Stones Talk", 2013
Photo: Serkan Taycan
Aslı Çavuşoğlu, "The Stones Talk", 2013
Photo: Serkan Taycan
Aslı Çavuşoğlu, "The Stones Talk", 2013
Photo: Serkan Taycan
Aslı Çavuşoğlu, "The Stones Talk", 2013
Photo: Serkan Taycan
"The Stones Talk" brought together 71 objects, archaeological artefacts that the artist reconstructed by using various materials.

The archaeological artefacts selected for the exhibition were discovered at various excavation sites in Turkey, yet subjected to a particular classification system and deemed unworthy of exhibition. The Ministry of Culture and Tourism of the Republic of Turkey classifies such pieces as "study pieces". According to paragraph c, Article 3 of the Regulation on Classification, Registration and Acceptance to Museums of Movable Cultural and Natural Heritage Requiring Protection, study pieces are defined as "the
group of protected artefacts, under Law No 2863 on Conservation of Cultural and Natural Heritage, which are not qualified for entry in the Artefacts Inventory Log but rather suitable for scientific studies". These pieces are considered deficient, formless or insignificant, as they do not seem to provide an idea about the whole they might have been part of. They are often either kept in museum storages, or forwarded to the relevant departments of universities for scientific research.

For this exhibition, Aslı Çavuşoğlu produced copies of a selection of 71 study pieces. While producing the copies, she used their original materials such as wood, bronze, glass, iron, mosaic or ceramic. The artist then completed these pieces into new "wholes", reconstructing them with a diverse range of materials including ceramic, rubber, epoxy, plexiglass, felt, volcanic rock, leather, and foam.

For the installation, Çavuşoğlu designed pedestals, using high-density foam, wood, and rubber. The objects in the exhibition were randomly numbered from 1 to 71. This numbering did not refer to any thematic, chronological or geographical classification.

The exhibition explored the potential of forming narratives with archaeological and historical information and telling pluralistic stories through objects.