Bahar Yürükoğlu: Flow Through
Bahar Yürükoğlu
Flow Through

Curator:
Duygu Demir

30 March–15 May 2016
Duygu Demir, on “Flow Through”
Bahar Yürükoğlu, Flow Through
Exhibition view: Arter, 2016
Photo: Ali Taptık
Bahar Yürükoğlu, Flow Through
Exhibition view: Arter, 2016
Photo: Ali Taptık
Bahar Yürükoğlu, Flow Through
Exhibition view: Arter, 2016
Photo: Ali Taptık
Bahar Yürükoğlu, Flow Through
Exhibition view: Arter, 2016
Photo: Ali Taptık
In her practice, Bahar Yürükoğlu brings together the extreme ends of the natural and the human-made, where the urge for reconciling the two creates new spaces that the artist calls neo-scapes. The coming together of these two binaries offer seductive compositions, in which an unabashed embracing of colour, a genuine appreciation of material and a playful use of light entice the viewer into a space where expectations can then be subverted.

"Flow Through" takes as its departure point Bahar Yürükoğlu's experiences during her travels to the Arctic Circle in 2015, both in the summertime, when the sun doesn't set, and during the winter months, when darkness prevails. In the exhibition, the artist creates fictional spaces based on the dualities she observed in the Arctic region; blurring the boundaries between presence and absence, past and future, nature and civilisation, as well as cyclical movements and inevitable transformations, these installations, photographs and videos test the viewer's perceptive capacities, and demand that the dichotomy between the subject and the object is set aside.

"Plexiberg" (2016) is a complex layering of material and light where the light emitted from the lens of the projector, bounces off of the surfaces of the physical objects, creating an immersive maze and a visual riddle. Playing heavily with the translation between two-dimensional and three-dimensional space, this deconstructed iceberg is accompanied by the sounds of melting ice from the Arctic. The artist's embrace of sensory experience is further amplified in "Pingo" (2016), in which changes in floor elevation demand from the viewer a heightened awareness of the surrounding environment. The soundscape that alternates between birds chirping, the faint techno music from a car radio and the familiar sound of snow crushing under the weight of someone walking that accompanies this installation further simulates the uncategorizable geography of the Arctic landscape, between a desaturated terrain and cultural depository, which the artist characterizes as a "future perfect world." Yürükoğlu's photographs that follow these installations cut into the supposed fact of the photographic image by complicating it with filters, reflections, disjunctions, collapsing and expanding the picture plane. These unaltered exercises in trompe l'œil also signify an effort to overcome the limits of Cartesian space.

The coda of the exhibition is the non-linear video "The Navigator", in which a flâneuse from the future perfect or the past continuous wanders in the natural landscape, the interiors of buildings in the deserted Soviet town of Pyramiden near Svalbard, or rides on the bus, perhaps a kind of figurative Arctic express. Her ceremonial gestures and primordial signals typify a striving for existential mark-making however transient, or a hope at communication, mimicking the cyclical motions of life, as we flow through.